Working At Heights: WorkSafe Launches Fall Prevention Campaign

WorkSafe has been vigorously promoting their working at heights safety campaign since 2011, and now reports have indicated that following a death of a labourer, they plan to further expand on their efforts to promote safety. The worker fell from a rooftop of an Oakleigh South factory and was found later by workmates. WorkSafe’s General Manager of Operations Lisa Sturszenegger has continuously promoted safety precautions for those who work at heights.

Preliminary enquiry showed that the man is believed to have fallen from up to five metres when he was replacing the factory’s roof. Sturzenegger is reportedly hopeful that this tragedy will send a message to the industry that quality safety standards must be implemented at all times.

Sturzenegger stated that proper equipment, training, supervision, risk assessment, and frequent maintenance is fundamental to maintaining safety in the workplace. This is the most recent death in a series of construction deaths this year. WorkSafe has launched a campaign this week to promote the continual need for safety requirements to be consistently met. Sturzenegger called for a continuous effort to maintain safety standards in order to limit the costs to the community for areas such as compensation, treatment and rehabilitation.

The investigation into the incident continues, and further information is expected as the inquiry develops.

Source: http://designbuildsource.com.au/worksafe-falls-warning-strengthen-workplace-death 

Working At Heights: No Christmas Banners

working at heights trainingNo Christmas greetings will be displayed throughout Rockhampton’s main streets because of workplace health and safety concerns with working at heights. Councils have been informed that the usual season’s greetings banners are no longer permitted to be hung from light poles. Because of the recent strict controls and the risk of significant insurance claims, the banners are no longer acceptable.

Banners will also be prohibited from being hung on the Bruce Highway—the northern and southern entry points into the city.Michael Rowe, acting general manager of community services, claims that the problem has arisen from stricter guidelines by Transport and Main Roads.

Despite no incidents in the past over the injury of staff while erecting or dismantling banners, it is now considered a liability as it is no longer a safe bet.Corporate event organisers will also be prohibited from setting up banners.Councillors have been informed that the lack of highway banners will be compensated for by an increase in Christmas decorations at other locations.

Small festival banners will exist on East St, Quay St and along the Riverside Boardwalk  and lights will hang on Morgan’s main street, Keppel Sands, on the council offices in Gracemere, at Queens Park, and various other locations.

Source: http://www.themorningbulletin.com.au/story/2011/11/29/banners-become-a-christmas-casualty/

Make an Enquiry: